Wednesday, October 5, 2011

How to: Liquefy African Black Soap Bar


African black soap is now a staple in my home.  Soon after I began using it all the time I noticed how quickly it disintagrated in the shower even though I kept it wrapped in plastic.  I decided to get the most use of my black soap bars I'd definitely need to start liquifying and bottling it. 
Step 1: Instead of going out and buying bottles I used empty to almost empty bottles of old products I had.
Step 2: Cut or break off 1/4 lb black soap.


Step 2:  I had 2, 12 oz. bottles and one 32 oz. bottle to fill up.  I boiled about 7 cups of water.

Step 3:  While waiting for the water to come to a rolling boil, I broke off several small chunks of black soap to help the soap melt more quickly. Black soap is very easy to brake apart although you can use a grater as well.

Step 4: Pour the boiling water into the bowl of broken up soap. 
This was a pretty small bowl.  I transferred it to a larger one so I could pour all of the water into it.

Step 5: Let stand covered for 2-3 hours until soap clumps are completely dissolved into the water.
Step 6: Transfer the liquified black soap into smaller bottles.  You may use a funnel or like I do and use a small plastic cup of the liquified black soad using a steady hand to pour it into my empty bottles.
One of the many things I love about black soap is that it will never go "bad" or expire. I store the bottles underneath my bathroom cupboard with the lid tightly secured. I use the larger bottle as a refill for the smaller two.  I use it on my hair as needed, my face daily, and as a daily body wash.  This is the most cost effective beauty product I have in my regimen.

NOTE: Since writing this post, I learned I needed to add a natural preservative agent to my liquid black soap to prevent contamination and bacteria from forming.  Contaminated products can cause serious adverse health reactions.  [Read more here on natural preservatives for homemade products]
 HHG!

12 comments:

  1. Actually, all you have to do is crumble it into little chunks into your bottle of water. Shake it up every couple minutes and oila! It dissolves and room temperature water, easily.

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  2. Really...wow thats good to know if I only need a mix up a bottle or two but when I liquify I end up with about half gallon of black soap so for me using hot water and a large bowl makes more sense. I usually dont have time for shaking multiple bottles...I can forget it and come back in half hr or so once its completely dissolved into the water. Thanks for sharing though! ;o) ~ Kynxx

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  3. I want to try this however I am very concerned to do so due to microscopic bacteria that WILL inevitably form in home-made liquid black soap. I have done a lot of research on this topic & found numerous sources & info saying that anytime you add water to a product it creates a breeding ground for bacteria. I'm sure we've all experienced how mold can start to grow in a hair product or raw shea butter or just a stagnant dish of water that is left to sit out for days...unlike mold this bacteria may not even be visible to the eye but will be present & harmful to the skin so...I'm not sure what to do. I know there are A TON of bloggers & YouTubers who make this & use it w/o a problem BUT I am still hesitant...bar soap does not go bad b/c there is not water in it but once you ADD liquid in w/o a preservative you are inviting bacteria to grow in your product! I'm so torn...I may end up buying a natural preservative to add in to be on the safe side! What do you think?

    Shelly

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  4. Hi Shelly,

    I'm grateful you took the time to read this post and especially for sharing with me information I honestly never took into consideration. I use Rosemary essential in my flaxseed gel and for its growth benefits and was happy to learn it also works as an antioxidant antimicrobial preservative so I'll DEFINITELY add it to my black soap moving forward. It has been over 3-4 days so I will be tossing my liquified black soap and making new batches tomorrow. I have never researched bateria in products and appreciate you opening my eyes to this part of DIY hair care. My passion is hair styling however I also dabble in a few of my own homemade concoctions but I hadn't looked into how to preserve them. Black Soap is really the only thing I make that requires storage over more than 3-4 days time span, refrigerated. I make flaxseed gel and use it right away discarding the rest with is usually not much. I had no idea I could have been harming myself and my family simply by adding water. Thank you for sharing with me what you took the time to research. I'll be updating the info above. I researched your findings on my own and provided my source of reference below so others can read and will know as well, thank you. Be blessed. ~Kynxx

    http://www.fromnaturewithlove.com/library/preservatives.asp
    Water provides a medium for harmful bacteria, mold, yeast and fungi to grow over time. If used, a contaminated product could cause severe health problems, blindness and even death. Your product must be adequately preserved to prevent contamination and microbial growth.

    From Nature With Love

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  5. Hi Amber, it's Shelly here again!!! I just wanted to say a BIG THANK-YOU for letting me know what yu think & for doing your own independent research & updating your finds. I really appreciate it b/c like I said, I have watched TONS of tutorials on liquifying black soap & read a lot of blog posts, etc, & almost NO ONE ever mentions using a preservative!!! And most of these people have beautiful skin, so it obviously seems to be working for them...I guess it is just a personal decision, but despite many people's good results w/o a preservative I just don't want to risk mine & my family's health! Those ^^^^ side affects from the bacteria are no joke!

    I went ahead & made some the other night & have just kept it in my fridge while I am waiting for a natural preservative (Grapeseed Extract) that I ordered online arrives. I will definitely throw this batch out after about 3 days & probably just continue to make very small batches.

    One thing I am not 100% clear on is Extract vs. Essential Oil...most of the websites I found said to use "Rosemary EXTRACT" or "Grapeseed Extract" not Rose. or Grape. Ess. Oil...are extracts & essential oils the same thing? I'm not sure on this but want to make sure I'm using the right ingredients...any light you can shed on this would be much appreciated! I will continue to do my own research & check back w/ you if I find anything great!

    Thank you!

    Shelly

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  6. Actually when the black soap is in the bottle, it can't get cross-contaminated because you are not dipping your fingers in it, etc. Use distilled or purified water and you are good. Been doing this for over 10 years on none has ever gone bad on me.

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  7. Can this liquid black soap be used in the vaginal area? Don't mean to abrupt but I am pretty sensitive but I would like to use african black soap as a bath soap since I have acne on my back and have struggled with it for years. I just can't get rid of it because I can't use all soaps, mostly just baby wash and dove moisturizing or sensitive bar. Sorry ladies but I need help ladies.
    Thank You All in Advance

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    1. Hi Olivia,
      Im really not sure...it's something you'd have to try on your own. I use it on my ENTIRE body and have no issues what so ever.

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  8. Thanks for sharing. I have been doing this for a couple of years and have never had my liquefied black soap 'go bad'. While reading the comments about bacteria my mind went back to when I was first given the black soap as a gift. It was already in liquid form and the couple who gave it to me explained that black soap is naturally anti-bacterial in any form. Once I tried it, I was hooked overnight and never looked back :) I noticed my towels stay fresh a lot longer, and I and several friends use it as a carwash, shampoo and toothpaste. I think research is always good, but I wonder if black soap's naturally 'anti-bacterial' property has been taken into consideration . . .

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    1. At this point with the research I have done, even if black soap does have some anti-bacteral properties I'd still use some type of ANTI-MICROBIAL. There is a difference. The primary difference between antibacterial and antimicrobial substances is the types of microorganism they act upon. While antibacterial products prevent the development of bacteria, antimicrobial agents such as alcohol-based hand sanitizers prevent the spread of bacteria, fungi, and some viruses. This is a much broader scope of protection than the protection found in antibacterial products. It's funny because at the end of the day everyone has an opinion on what should be done when it comes to liquefying black soap....I say do whatever makes you feel comfortable! Thanks for reading and taking the time to share your experience Dub! :)

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  9. Nice web page. I love the background music. Just a small note on the water and bacteria...I use distilled water which doesn't seem to cause problems with mold or bacteria. I haven't used any oils since I like the scent of the soap by itself and don't want to change it but I do use essential oils in other things. It probably becomes more of an issue if you plan to store this long term but when I make this I pretty much use it right away. Overall I prefer to use natural products for microbial protection. The use of some anti-microbial products defeat the purpose of going natural to begin with and many times people underestimate the potency of some natural products at doing what they do. But of course to each their own! Thanks for posting! It's a beautiful site! :)

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  10. Another note regarding microorganisms and water is that just by heating the water to boiling you are actually killing any microorganisms that may be in the water. The water only needs to be 165 degrees to start killing them and I would typically let it boil anyway since it dissolves the soap faster that way but you could also keep the water boiling for five minutes before adding it to your mix to eliminate any doubt about it. Some of us might do this already just by way of multitasking on other things while waiting for it to boil.

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